Carotid Arteries


Image caption : Carotid Arteries : The carotid arteries run up along either side of the front of the neck. Together with two other large arteries, which run through the neck vertebrae, they supply the brain with fresh, oxygenated blood.

Common carotid artery

right common carotid artery arises from the brachiocephalic artery, and the left common carotid arises from the aortic arch; gives rise to the external and internal carotid arteries; supplies the respective sides of the head and neck

External carotid artery

arises from the common carotid artery; supplies blood to numerous structures within the face, lower jaw, neck, esophagus, and larynx

Internal carotid artery

arises from the common carotid artery and begins with the carotid sinus; goes through the carotid canal of the temporal bone to the base of the brain; combines with branches of the vertebral artery forming the arterial circle; supplies blood to the brain

Carotid artery

The common carotid artery divides into internal and external carotid arteries. The right common carotid artery arises from the brachiocephalic artery and the left common carotid artery arises directly from the aortic arch. The external carotid artery supplies blood to numerous structures within the face, lower jaw, neck, esophagus, and larynx. These branches include the lingual, facial, occipital, maxillary, and superficial temporal arteries. The internal carotid artery initially forms an expansion known as the carotid sinus, containing the carotid baroreceptors and chemoreceptors. Like their counterparts in the aortic sinuses, the information provided by these receptors is critical to maintaining cardiovascular homeostasis (see Figure).

Arteries Supplying the Head and Neck

This diagram shows the blood vessels in the head and brain.

The common carotid artery gives rise to the external and internal carotid arteries. The external carotid artery remains superficial and gives rise to many arteries of the head. The internal carotid artery first forms the carotid sinus and then reaches the brain via the carotid canal and carotid foramen, emerging into the cranium via the foramen lacerum. The vertebral artery branches from the subclavian artery and passes through the transverse foramen in the cervical vertebrae, entering the base of the skull at the vertebral foramen. The subclavian artery continues toward the arm as the axillary artery.

Arteries Serving the Brain

This diagram shows the arteries of the brain.

This inferior view shows the network of arteries serving the brain. The structure is referred to as the arterial circle or circle of Willis.

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In anatomy, the left and right common carotid arteries (English pronunciation: /kəˈrɒtɪd/) are arteries that supply the head and neck with oxygenated blood; they divide in the neck to form the external and internal carotid arteries.



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